Shelter


SAMH and The Mental Health Foundation

See Me: End Mental Health Discrimination

Objective

How do charities get accurate information about sensitive subjects? Jump Research challenged YouGov to help them understand the landscape of mental health problems in Scotland, on behalf of See Me Scotland, the programme to end mental health discrimination. The intention was to see how many people in Scotland have faced stigma relating to their mental health problems, and to raise awareness of the issue, to coincide with the launch of the charity’s “It’s Okay” campaign, which encouraged people to seek support if they’re struggling.

Solution

Using the YouGov Scotland Omnibus, See Me were able to gauge awareness of their video campaign among 1,000 Scottish adults, before asking respondents about their own experiences with mental health problems. YouGov’s results revealed that 68% of those surveyed have had experience of dealing with mental health problems, with either themselves or someone close to them being effected. By reassuring respondents that their answers would be fully anonymous, and providing information as to where they seek advice about mental health problems, See Me were able to accurately investigate a topic that many are typically reluctant to discuss.

Results

The findings from this fast-turnaround research were used to draw attention to the high prevalence of mental health problems in Scotland. See Me Scotland compared the findings to their own research among young people with mental health problems, and found a stark difference between what parents think they know, and the support that young people actually need. See Me’s release gained widespread coverage in both national media (BBC) and the regional press.

About the client

See Me is Scotland’s programme to end mental health discrimination, managed by a partnership of SAMH and The Mental Health Foundation. Funded by The Scottish Government and Comic Relief, their aim is to end mental health stigma and discrimination, and enabling people who experience mental health problems to live fulfilled lives.